In 1941 Earl ("Skip") Williams began his career at Berlin Industries (name at that time was I.S. Berlin). Skip’s strong work ethic and talent didn’t go unnoticed during his twenty years with Berlin. His progress through the company was progressive considering the times.

With encouragement and support from Berlin Industries, in 1963 Skip and his wife Hazel opened Fidelity Bindery Company, the first minority owned bindery in the Mid-West. Fidelity began ahead of its time, and continues to break new ground.

By 1970, Fidelity had grown into the largest black owned graphic arts company in the United States.

After years of success and growth, Fidelity had become a company that would service the graphic arts industry and related business communities as more than a bindery house. This company, while delivering excellence in printing, bindery and fulfillment, focused on all of the needs of the customer. To reflect the growth in capabilities, in 1999 they changed their name to Fidelity Print Communications. To further insure their customers’ projects receive the greatest consideration and level of quality, Fidelity Print Communications formed a partnership with Berlin Industries, one of the largest commercial printing and direct mail organizations in the country and the company that originally gave Skip his first opportunities. Rather than a merger or acquisition, the two companies formed a true strategic alliance built on the foundation of the 58 year relationship Skip had with Berlin.

42  years since the launch of the company, Williams, along with his sons, daughters and grandchildren have continued to add to the legacy of excellence at Fidelity Print Communications.

While providing their customers with graphic arts services that are second to none, FPC also focuses on developing the technical skill sets of the urban community. FPC provides employment and training opportunities specifically targeted to communities affected by unemployment and limited opportunities. Part of the FPC mission is to help close the technological divide that separates millions of Americans from employment opportunities and more productive lives.

Copyright © 2008 Fidelity Print Communications